tedium

tedium, boredom, ennui, doldrums are comparable when they denote a state of dissatisfaction and weariness. Tedium suggests a repression of energy for lack of a proper or adequate outlet, and dullness or lowness of spirits resulting from irksome inactivity or from the irksome monotony of one's pursuits or surroundings
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incessant recurrence without variety breeds tediumLowes

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able boys and girls will go through endless tedium . . . to acquire some coveted knowledge or skill— Russell

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Boredom adds to tedium suggestions of listlessness, dreariness, and unrest resulting either from a lack of interest in one's pursuits or surroundings or from the fact that they pall or fail to excite interest
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I suppose I shall go on "existing" till the boredom of it becomes too great— J. R. Green

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wealthy indolent women . . . who got up at noon and spent the rest of the day trying to relieve their boredomDahl

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Ennui stresses profound dissatisfaction, discontent, or weariness of spirit; usually it suggests physical depression, languor, or lassitude as well as boredom
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that ennui, that terrible taedium vitae, that comes on those to whom life denies nothing— Wilde

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the inexhaustible power and activity of his mind leave him no leisure for ennuiArnold

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Doldrums applies to a phase or period of depression that in persons may be marked by listlessness, despondency, and flagging energy
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Lotharioism is simple monogamy's doldrums multiplied, and with thrice monogamy's duties— Nathan

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or in more general applications (as to economic activity) may be marked by inactivity and dullness.
Analogous words: irksomeness, tediousness, tiresomeness, wearisomeness (see corresponding adjectives at IRKSOME): melancholy, dumps, blues, gloom (see SADNESS)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Tedium — Te di*um, n. [L. taedium, fr. taedet it disgusts, it wearies one.] Irksomeness; wearisomeness; tediousness. [Written also {t[ae]dium}.] Cowper. [1913 Webster] To relieve the tedium, he kept plying them with all manner of bams. Prof. Wilson. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • tedium — (n.) 1660s, from L. taedium weariness, disgust, related to taedet it is wearisome, and to taedere to weary. Possible cognates are O.C.S. tezo, Lith. tingiu to be dull, be listless …   Etymology dictionary

  • tedium — [n] dullness, monotony banality, boredom, deadness*, doldrums, drabness, dreariness, ennui, irksomeness, lack of interest, lifelessness, routine, sameness, tediousness, tiresomeness, wearisomeness, yawn*; concepts 388,410,668 Ant. diversion,… …   New thesaurus

  • tedium — ► NOUN ▪ the state of being tedious …   English terms dictionary

  • tedium — [tē′dē əm] n. [L taedium < taedet, it disgusts, offends] the condition or quality of being tiresome, wearisome, boring, or monotonous; tediousness …   English World dictionary

  • tedium — te|di|um [ˈti:diəm] n [U] the feeling of being bored because the things you are doing are not interesting and continue for a long time without changing ▪ We sang while we worked, to relieve the tedium . tedium of ▪ the tedium of everyday life …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • tedium — [[t]ti͟ːdiəm[/t]] N UNCOUNT: oft N of n If you talk about the tedium of a job, task, or situation, you think it is boring and rather frustrating. She began to wonder whether she wouldn t go mad with the tedium of the job. Syn: boredom …   English dictionary

  • tedium — noun 1) she loathed the tedium of housework Syn: monotony, boredom, ennui, uniformity, routine, dreariness, dryness, banality, vapidity, insipidity Ant: variety 2) I dozed off during the tedium of the third act …   Thesaurus of popular words

  • tedium — noun (U) the quality of being tedious: She hated the tedium of life in a small country village …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • tedium — /ˈtidiəm / (say teedeeuhm) noun the state of being wearisome; irksomeness; tediousness: *The solution – to work – is not simply an escape from the felt tedium of home duties. –lyn richards, 1985. {Latin taedium} …   Australian English dictionary

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